Application of Ex Vivo Cryo-imaging Technique for Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Atherosclerotic Plaque Rupture

Authors

  • Ahmad A Abdul-Aziz University of Michigan, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
  • Ross Cotton Simpleware Ltd, Exeter, United Kingdom
  • Simon Richards 2Simpleware Ltd, Exeter, United Kingdom
  • Ali Faramarzalian School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
  • Philippe G Young Simpleware Ltd, Exeter, United Kingdom
  • Daniel Chamie Division of Cardiology, Harrington-McLaughlin Heart and Vascular Institute, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
  • David L. Wilson Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
  • Hiram G. Bezerra Division of Cardiology, Harrington-McLaughlin Heart and Vascular Institute, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
  • Marco A. Costa Division of Cardiology, Harrington-McLaughlin Heart and Vascular Institute, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14738/jbemi.24.1335

Keywords:

Cryo Imaging, Finite Element, Plaque Rupture, Ex Vivo, atherosclerotic lesion

Abstract

Cryo-imaging is an ex vivo vascular imaging modality that acquires serial 2D fluorescence and bright-field images at 20μm increments without sacrifice to tissue morphology. These features make Cryo-imaging an attractive approach for rendering high-resolution 3D volumes that may serve as a basis for finite element analysis (FEA) studies of plaque rupture. This work demonstrates the first use of Cryo-imaging for the imaging of a human coronary vessel and the subsequent rendering of a 3D FE model that clearly delineates critical anatomical features of atherosclerotic plaque.  FEA is then performed to assess the plaque rupture conditions that result in a thrombotic episode.

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Published

2015-09-02

How to Cite

Abdul-Aziz, A. A., Cotton, R., Richards, S., Faramarzalian, A., Young, P. G., Chamie, D., Wilson, D. L., Bezerra, H. G., & Costa, M. A. (2015). Application of Ex Vivo Cryo-imaging Technique for Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Atherosclerotic Plaque Rupture. Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging, 2(4), 46. https://doi.org/10.14738/jbemi.24.1335