A Course-Based Qualitative Inquiry: What Relational-Centred Practice Looks Like When in a Power-Over Position of Authority

Authors

  • Adrianna Cambridge
  • Sarah Fereja
  • Irene Mai
  • Alice Yuan
  • Gerard Bellefeuille MacEwan University Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14738/assrj.72.7760

Abstract

In this article, we report on the innovative research design and results of a course-based qualitative inquiry into child and youth care (CYC) students' experiences of maintaining a relational-centered practice stance while in a power-over position of authority. Qualitative data from two semi-structured focus groups as well as an arts-based data collection technique were analyzed using the thematic analysis method. The following four major themes were identified from the analyses: (a) “self-awareness is key,” (b) “the mediating power of a positive trusting relationship,” (c) “the vital importance of emotional safety,” and (d) “it’s a two-way street.” The results of this course-based study revealed that, although CYC students are committed to practicing relationally, the dynamics of being in a position of power-over authority are complex and challenging to navigate.

Author Biography

Gerard Bellefeuille, MacEwan University Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Dept. Child and Youth Care

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Published

2020-02-16

How to Cite

Cambridge, A. ., Fereja, S. ., Mai, I. ., Yuan, A. ., & Bellefeuille, G. (2020). A Course-Based Qualitative Inquiry: What Relational-Centred Practice Looks Like When in a Power-Over Position of Authority. Advances in Social Sciences Research Journal, 7(2), 20–27. https://doi.org/10.14738/assrj.72.7760