A practical method of predicting wellbeing at work: the Wellbeing Process Tool

Keywords: Wellbeing, Wellbeing Process Questionnaire,

Abstract

Research has shown that short measuring instruments (e.g. the Wellbeing Process Questionnaire – WPQ) can provide information about aspects of wellbeing. These measures have been shown to have good validity and reliability and can be used to assess multi-dimensional models (e.g. the Demands-Resources-Individual Effects model – DRIVE). The present article describes the practical application of the approach.

 

Author Biography

Andrew Smith, Cardiff University

Psychology

Professor

References

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Published
2018-02-25
How to Cite
Williams, G., & Smith, A. (2018). A practical method of predicting wellbeing at work: the Wellbeing Process Tool. Advances in Social Sciences Research Journal, 5(1). https://doi.org/10.14738/assrj.52.4158