The (Perceived) Vanishing of the Leisure Class: Views from Weber, Veblen, and Piketty

Main Article Content

Gayle Kathleen Berardi
Thomas Segady

Abstract

The French economist Thomas Piketty has recently provided extensive documentation that economic inequality in the most developed countries has grown and will continue to grow.  Relying on data primarily from Britain, France--and to a lesser extent, the United States and Germany-- Piketty asserts that this trend will continue, barring events such as major wars or internal revolutions.  Weber saw capitalism in much the same terms, emphasizing slow capital accumulation over relatively long periods of time, which brought distinction and legitimacy to the holder of large amounts of capital.  Veblen focused on the conspicuous display of this legitimation.  However, in light of the extent of global capital Piketty’s analysis provides clues to reasons for the emergence of global flows of capital combined with the perceived physical disappearance of wealthy capitalists themselves.

Article Details

How to Cite
Berardi, G. K., & Segady, T. (2016). The (Perceived) Vanishing of the Leisure Class: Views from Weber, Veblen, and Piketty. Advances in Social Sciences Research Journal, 3(6). https://doi.org/10.14738/assrj.36.2065
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Gayle Kathleen Berardi, Colorado State University-Pueblo Pueblo Colorado USA

Professor of Political Science

Program Coordinator

Thomas Segady, Stephen F. Austin State University Sociology Department Nacogdoches Texas USA

Professor Emeritus of Sociology

 

References

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