Sexual Self-Concept through a Cross-Cultural Lens: Qualitative Case Studies of Iranian-American Women

Main Article Content

Mitra Rashidian
Victor Minichiello
Rafat Hussain

Abstract

Abstract

 

Recently scholars have examined more closely the topic of female sexual self-concept as an aspect of sexual well-being. Few studies have focused on migrated women’s life experiences cross-culturally, and how that informs a woman’s view of herself as a sexual being. This is particularly true about most middle-eastern cultures, including Iranian-American women.  Four case studies draw on qualitative data from interviews with first generation Iranian-American women in the USA to describe the sexual self-concepts evolving as a result of life in both cultures.  Applying narrative methodology and feminist theoretical perspectives two themes were revealed. These are i) the influence of family power, and ii) patriarchal social practices.  The analysis introduces a multidimensional aspect and process associated with each woman’s view of her sexual self-concept, which takes into account their behaviours, cognitions, and emotions developed in each life stage, and inform her sexual subjectivity (view of herself as a sexual being). Implications of these findings for clinicians and policy makers involved in sexual health care for women are briefly discussed.

 

Keywords: sexual self-concept, cross-cultural, Iranian-American women, sexuality, power relations

Article Details

How to Cite
Rashidian, M., Minichiello, V., & Hussain, R. (2015). Sexual Self-Concept through a Cross-Cultural Lens: Qualitative Case Studies of Iranian-American Women. Advances in Social Sciences Research Journal, 2(10). https://doi.org/10.14738/assrj.210.1539
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Mitra Rashidian, University of New England, Australia

Honorary Adjunct Lecturer

Ph.D. in Counseling

School of Health

Victor Minichiello, Emeritus Professor Victor Minichiello, PhD Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards (TEQSA) Expert, Conjoint Professor, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle Adjunct Professor, The Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University Adjunct Professor, School of Justice, Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology

Emeritus Professor Victor Minichiello, PhD

Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards (TEQSA) Expert,

Conjoint Professor, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle

Adjunct Professor, The Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University

Adjunct Professor, School of Justice, Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology

Rafat Hussain, Australian National University ANU Medical School & Research School of Population Health Canberra, Australia

Rafat Hussain, Ph.D.

Australian National University

ANU Medical School & Research School of Population Health

Canberra, Australia

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